Architecture-Design

Glass and Timber Houses (Hampson Williams Ltd)

A Grand Designs episode was on the other night featuring two eco houses squeezed into a rather narrow plot in South London. The plan was to build two identical homes, selling one to finance the other in hopes of living mortgage free. Even though the owners ended up way over the original budget (as most builds do on the show), the outcome was spectacular. Despite the small footprint, the use of oblique windows and skylights opened up the space and maximized light, all while maintaining a keen sense of privacy. Plus, seeing as the home owner was also the owner of a joinery/carpentry firm, he was able to construct the houses himself alongside his team, and, as a result, the craftsmanship was impeccable. It was altogether inspiring. If you’re planning on building on a small plot of land, you might want to check it out.

other bullet points: grass covered roof, constructed using sustainable materials and high performance glass and insulation, low impact piling foundation system, rain-harvesting system

list of materials and sources used here

architect: hampson williams, architecture
homeowner’s site: Talisman Manufacturing

3D Home Kit and Home Quick Planner

If you are dreaming about your dream house, yet aren’t quite sure how it will fit together spatially, you might want to try out this inexpensive kit. Seeing your design properly in 3d might help iron out any kinks and get it closer to becoming a feasible project.

3D Home Kit (left): $39.95, Buy it here.

Also shown (right), Home Quick Planner: $29.95, Buy it here.
(kit includes 700 precut, reusable peel-and-stick furniture and architectural symbols for every room in the house including the kitchen, study, bedrooms and bathrooms.)

Purchase Information:

Price: $39.95
Availability: Buy 3D Home Kit and Home Quick Planner here

House JEF

Wow, you’d think something as simple as sticking a box onto an older row house could not look this beautiful, but somehow it succeeds inordinately well. Check out the last image where you can see the old/original staircase and beyond into the addition. It looks as if they’ve used the existing garden wall as the interior wall, painting it white to differentiate it from the outside. Spectacular.

photos Dujardin Filip

[via OWI]

More information:

View House JEF here

Source: Via

Guga Architecture

I just came across the brilliantly simple work of Guga Architecture. The architect removed the dropped ceilings in the public rooms of the house, sandblasting the exposed rafters and raising the height to an expansive 16 feet.

More information:

View Guga Architecture here

David Baker + Partners overhaul of Shift in San Francisco

David Baker + Partners is just the type of architecture firm you like to hear about. They are active in urban development and they turned this sad building into a great live/work space for Baker.

The home also has an impressive list of environmental features:

2.0K solar electric system generating over half of electrical power on site.
Solar domestic hot water collection system providing over half of water heating needs.
Digital dimming lighting controls on all lights to reduce consumption and extend bulb life.
Small-scale appliances: under-counter refrigerator, freezer, and dishwasher.
Passive solar design: high thermal mass, polished concrete floors, and south-facing clerestory warm the living areas.
Casework and wood doors made from rapidly renewable material: bamboo plywood.
Walls insulated with ground recycled denim batting.
Rain garden system diverts roof water runoff from city sewage system and into local aquifers.
Permeable infiltration garden and pavers in city public sidewalk intercept storm water runoff in public right of way.

Piso “biombo” (Folding Screen Hallway)

Whoa, take a look at this kick ass hallway. Folding doors are located within the walls that swivel open in different directions depending on the privacy needed. I also really like the way they handled the exposed brick and white columns.

Reforma de piso
Architect: Alfredo Sirvent
Photographer: Santos-Díez

See it here.

[via materialicious]

[posted by katie]

Maison Flottante (Floating House) by Bouroullec Brothers

Seeing as I posted the Slow Chair today and mentioned this houseboat, I might as well give you the pics too. While not all of us can live on the water, the Maison Flottante does give inspiration for a minimal aesthetic. In this particular case, a few curated pieces allows for more visual space while large windows center attention on the view.

The Floating House is a studio for resident artists and authors invited by the Cneai, national contemporary art center for publication. Initiated in 2002 by a public commission and finished in 2006, this habitable barge was realized in collaboration with the architects Jean-Marie Finot and Denis.

photos: www.gaelleleboulicaut.com

See it here. (click 2006, floating house : interiors)

Cottam Hargrave: Ranch House

I remember seeing this on one of Fine Living’s Dwell series (do you remember them?) a few years ago. Located in central Texas, this ranch is miles and miles away from its nearest neighbor which allows for huge glass walls and uninterrupted views of the landscape (I think I remember the owner saying he sometimes wakes up to a cow looking into his bedroom wall/window). The large overhang roof provides much needed shade during hot summers, and as I remember, there’s a central brick structure that anchors the home and retains temperature*.

visit Cottam Hargrave’s site for more.

[via 2Modern Design Talk]

*please correct me if I’m wrong on any of this

Casa Blair Road by Ong & Ong

I’m currently in the planning stages of working on the landscape on my home, and since I’m in Southern California, I’m lucky enough to have nice weather almost year round, so one thing I’m striving for is a way to have indoor spaces which can easily transition to outdoor. I’m loving the Casa Blair Road house by Ong & Ong, which is simply stunning. The outdoor space feels like an extension of the home, and conversely, the transitional room feels like it’s outside.

[posted by kris]

Cinco Camp, Roger Black’s Texas retreat

NYTimes.com recently ran an article entitled Self-Contained in Texas which shows Roger Black’s Texas retreat. Made of five 8-by-20-foot containers, each one houses its own particular function and is joined by a walkway with a small deck and integrated grill.

“The opening on each compartment is fitted with sliding glass doors and screens to keep out stinging, biting and otherwise menacing creatures, and the rooms all face west so Mr. Black and any guests can watch the spectacular sunsets as well as distant locomotives toting the same kinds of shipping containers used in the home’s construction.” -By Kate Murphy

See NYTimes article for more.
All photos by James H. Evans for The New York Times

Matsudo Mansion by Bakoko Design and Development

The owners of Bakoko Design and Development recently undertook remodeling their post-war Japanese apartment down to painstaking detail. Walls were removed to create more of an open living plan and little gems of usability are hidden throughout the apartment. My favorite is the shock of pink on the walls hidden in the work compartment. I also really like the small vanity seen here.

[posted by kris]

London Urchin’s Fold-Out Jewel Box

300 square feet seems incredibly small, but the way this tiny studio is arranged it seems three times as big. The kitchen is especially notable, as doors unfold to reveal hidden compartments and storage space, as well as a sliding counter that extends for food preparation. The bright blue on the interior kitchen area is an incredibly smart touch, as it adds to the whole jewelry box concept.

My studio has been transformed into a flexible living space which allows me to work, sleep, eat, and relax within the confines of 300 square feet…The concept of a jewelry box has been expanded so that the space can be transformed through pushing, pulling, sliding, opening and closing of individual elements of the cabinetry. The rubber floor creates a seamless look that leads one’s gaze through the windows into the garden square below. I have a hidden stairway and secret compartment. I think it rocks. I am now broke. -Mia, the London Urchin via AT

architect: Jennifer Beningfield of Open Studio Architects (more photos and project description shown here.)

for more photos and the complete posting go here.
[via AT]

Shoreditch Prototype House

If you are building or remodeling a house, you might consider incorporating vertical planting to provide shade in the warmer months. As this project by Cox Bulleid Architects shows, you don’t need a lot of land to have a good amount of greenery, though it should be said to take care in making sure there are structural supports for any weight of large screens/mesh with plantings and soil.

The project has been developed as a prototype low energy house for dense urban sites and seeks to green the city through the use of vertical planting as screen, filter, sunshade and oxygenator to create a new ‘garden city’ in an urban context…Bolted on steel decks provide balconies and privacy screens while planting grown over the mesh gives shade in summer and allows direct solar heating in winter. – Cox Bulleid Architects

See it here.

[via Grand Designs]

Writer’s Studio (Ghent, NY)

I think I would be inspired to write something too if I had this for a studio, even if it was only just ‘how freaking awesome is this house’ over and over again. Check out residential architect online for product specifications and credits.

A dark, quiet, enigmatic shape in the woods, this building responds to a very simple program. “It’s mostly about reading and writing, watching the fire, and listening to music,” says Wendy Evans Joseph, FAIA, LEED AP. But in simplicity there is power, and Joseph’s distilled forms and highly tuned surfaces imbue familiar elements with iconic force. Our judges noted the deft handling of walnut in building assemblies and sculptural custom furnishings. -(bruce d. snider)

[via residential architect magazine]

See it here.

Loft (Qb3 Design)

How many of you could be okay with open cabinetry in your kitchen? This photo of Frank and Ditta Hoeber’s Philadelphia loft sure makes it tempting, doesn’t it? Check out the spread from LoftLife Magazine for more inspiration.

Frank and Ditta Hoeber’s Philadelphia loft is all about display. The architectural and design firm behind the space, Qb3 Design, wanted to create a “silent background” within which the couple could feature their book collection, art and objects.

See it here.