Windows

Annie Residence (Bercy Chen Studio)

This two family home in Austin uses so many large glass walls that it seems like an open air living space. Inspired by Asian architecture, the architects used large glass sheets to ensure spatial continuity between the indoor and outdoor spaces. Incorporating a body of water that perfectly matches the floor height further extends the space by reflecting light and, with a cluster of water plants carefully positioned so that they can be seen from various viewpoints, it adds a natural element that balances out all the steel and glass. Plus, take a look at that glowing garage and the sail used on the upper level to create a shady outdoor living space.

A few details/quotes from Dwell on the project:

The exterior walls of the Bercy house are constructed with Thermasteel, panels made from galvanized steel and a unique resin that provide structural framing, insulation, and vapor barrier with an R-29 rating twice the required amount. “We have so much glass that we have to offset it by having very efficient ceiling and wall systems,” says Bercy. “We wanted movable glass walls instead of tiny little sliding glass doors that pop off their tracks all the time,” says Bercy. So he and Chen tracked down the double-glazed, insulated, six-by-nine-foot doors rom a company called Fleetwood. “They’re a little more expensive, but when you slide the heavy doors open, you’re making a profound gesture to leave the house and step outside,” says Bercy. -Dwell

Roof Hatch

I stumbled upon the blog Building Green on Montrose where they’re tracking the renovation of a 100-year old rowhouse in Philadelphia. Besides being an interesting read, they’re providing some excellent links and references for materials. If you’ve ever thought about a roof hatch/deck, check out their post here.

Picture on left is taken from Building Green on Montrose (Update on the roof hatch).

Roof hatches shown on right available from Insula-Dome: Buy it here.

More information:

View Roof Hatch here

Recycled Windshield (Second Glass)

Sure, we’ve all seen some items made from windshields, but actually using the breaks and cracks of damaged windshields as a design element is something slightly new (to me, at least). I really wish they’d come up with better photography, but if you’ve any imagination you can see how this idea would be great as a shower door or, as shown above, as a wall divider or door.

Converting junk or damaged windshields into new glass products is a patent-pending process that we have perfected. While simple in concept it is a complex formula of art and science. We can add color to co-ordinate with other design elements. Second Glass can be framed, lighted, mounted, or hung just as in most glass applications creating attractive and easily maintained walls, dividers, fronts, partitions, and lighting.

Price available upon request. Buy it here.

[via materialicious]

Steel Window/Door Resources

The ever resourceful Julie from Remodelista did a great post about steel door and window fabricators. If you’re in the market, I highly suggest checking it out.

Photos shown above:
top two from Bliss Nor-Am (located Syracuse N.Y.)
bottom two from Crittall Windows (UK)

Source: Via

Hackett Hall McKnight’s Dowling House

I’m loving these large scale windows and simplicity of design in the Dowling House by Hackett Hall McKnight. Also of interest are these narrow doors which abut them, providing an interesting contrast.

Transom Windows

This apartment in Copenhagen is beautiful. From the light wood floors, to the white walls, to the simple furniture selections…I’m smitten.

I absolutely love the transom window above the door. If you have the ceiling height, it could be a good way to add extra light into a dark room or just make a plain door more interesting.

[posted by kris]

Purchase Information:

Price: $159.00
Availability: Buy Transom Windows here

Source: Via

Anderson Windows

When faced with old windows that have broken glass and mechanisms, or that are painted shut, or worse make it difficult to keep your home temperature regulated, it may be time to upgrade. Anderson makes windows that can be easily integrated into a modern remodel, and comes in three different product lines (400 series, 200 series and architectural) to meet your design and price point needs.

[posted by kris]

Outdoor/Indoor Cherry Twig Stickers

These stickers remind me of the Tattoo House that I posted a while back. It seems like this would be a smart way to get a little bit of that look without spending a whole lot.

“Stickers can be adhered to any glass or plexi surface, outdoors or in.
Easy to follow instructions are included.Once adhered, glass can be
washed normally. Minimum outdoor resistance, 3years. Frosted stickers allow 70% of light to pass through while maintaing maximum opacity, even at close range.
Use several sheets to create patterns and greater privacy.”


Standard size sheets are 20 x 40cm(11x17inches) and include all the elements indicated. Custom sizes are available by request.

[posted by katie]

Purchase Information:

Price: $22
Availability: Buy Outdoor/Indoor Cherry Twig Stickers here

Tattoo House by Andrew Maynard

Check out how these window stickers act as screening for this home in Australia. It’s quite notable how the architect has considered and met building requirements without sacrificing any design standard, in fact, just the opposite- he’s added to rather than detracted from the building’s overall facade, making it an elegant and beautiful structure.

Every element needed to perform multiple functions for maximum return- hence the kitchen bench becomes part of the stair, and the screening required by council reflects heat and glare away from the expansive windows, neatly eliminating the need for curtains. Council requirements regarding overlooking which dictate a 75% opacity to second-storey spaces are resolved by UV stable stickers rather than expensive and elaborate screening. The tree supergraphic creates playful and ever-changing shadows across the interior spaces and is composed of images taken in the local park.

Source: Via

 
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