RENOVATE

Galley House, Donald Chong Studio

Check out this slim-fit house in Toronto. Making use of a super tight lot, the home is a smart example of how space and light can be used to the best advantage. Dwell has some good shots of the interior and exterior, and check out the architect’s site (Donald Chong Studio) for floor plans and extra photos. I especially love the landscaping in the outdoor areas.

[via Dwell]

Waterproof Wide Sink

Wow, if you’re planning a bath remodel or working on one currently, have I got a deal for you. This awesome sink is 50% off at DWR. I love this sink and it hurts me that it would be perfect for my dream house but not so much my current house or else I’d snap this up in a second.

This sink is intended for wall mounted faucets, and it includes counterspace to the right of the sink. Oh man. I love it. I may just get one.

Purchase Information:

Price: $575.00
Availability: Buy Waterproof Wide Sink here

Glass and Timber Houses (Hampson Williams Ltd)

A Grand Designs episode was on the other night featuring two eco houses squeezed into a rather narrow plot in South London. The plan was to build two identical homes, selling one to finance the other in hopes of living mortgage free. Even though the owners ended up way over the original budget (as most builds do on the show), the outcome was spectacular. Despite the small footprint, the use of oblique windows and skylights opened up the space and maximized light, all while maintaining a keen sense of privacy. Plus, seeing as the home owner was also the owner of a joinery/carpentry firm, he was able to construct the houses himself alongside his team, and, as a result, the craftsmanship was impeccable. It was altogether inspiring. If you’re planning on building on a small plot of land, you might want to check it out.

other bullet points: grass covered roof, constructed using sustainable materials and high performance glass and insulation, low impact piling foundation system, rain-harvesting system

list of materials and sources used here

architect: hampson williams, architecture
homeowner’s site: Talisman Manufacturing

Amsterdam Sugar Warehouse

Not that original sugar warehouses are a dime a dozen, but this open plan space might be easy to replicate given a few splurges. The owners of this particular loft have used beige (or natural?) linen curtains throughout to separate areas and, surprisingly, it seems to work well with the original beams and floors. Curtains can look a little fussy at times, but given that the fabric and color is consistent in this case, they look functional and appropriate to the decor.

[via LoftLife Magazine]

More information:

View Amsterdam Sugar Warehouse here

Source: Via

Concrete Bathtubs

Over at Plastolux they covered a conversion from a contractor’s shop into a single-family residence. It’s an impressive project, and I do recommend taking a look. Instead of showing you the same pics, I’m going to just highlight the thing that jumped out at me: this concrete bathtub. Mainly, how would one would replicate that particular design, and is it a feasible DIY job?

Now, usually the internet is ever so helpful, but I didn’t really find a solid reference out there. There’s an example of how someone made a concrete soaking tub, which is sort of helpful, and a seemingly oversimplification of the suggested process here, but nothing that really inspires confidence in making the sort of nice curve that’s shown above. I suppose it’s a project for only brave folks. If you know of additional resources, please comment or email.

(And, yes, buying a bathtub would be way easier, but concrete looks so much more bespoke in that lovely modern industrial way.)

More information:

View Concrete Bathtubs here

Source: Via

BEHR Paint Contest

Submit a photo of your dullest room and say why it needs a makeover and you could win 3 gallons of BEHR paint. Why do you care? Because it could mean free paint. Now if they only offered to paint the room for you…

See Vidafine’s post for more details.

More information:

View BEHR Paint Contest here

Source: Via

Home of Sara Camre, Architect

Hellooo lovely white floors and walls, so nice to meet you. And, may I say your truck-mural-in-the-hallway has me tongue tied? It knocked me over the head… in a good way, of course.

This home of Sara Camre is a perfect example of how using white on floors and walls can really make furniture and art ‘pop’, even when the colors are softer shades/hues. I wish I had the guts to do a white floor somewhere, but each place I’ve lived has had really pretty wood floors, so there’s been no real need other than my curiosity to see how it might look.

Update: found more pics at Boligmagasinet.dk.

[via heyhome]

More information:

View Home of Sara Camre, Architect here

Source: Via

3D Home Kit and Home Quick Planner

If you are dreaming about your dream house, yet aren’t quite sure how it will fit together spatially, you might want to try out this inexpensive kit. Seeing your design properly in 3d might help iron out any kinks and get it closer to becoming a feasible project.

3D Home Kit (left): $39.95, Buy it here.

Also shown (right), Home Quick Planner: $29.95, Buy it here.
(kit includes 700 precut, reusable peel-and-stick furniture and architectural symbols for every room in the house including the kitchen, study, bedrooms and bathrooms.)

Purchase Information:

Price: $39.95
Availability: Buy 3D Home Kit and Home Quick Planner here

Annie Residence (Bercy Chen Studio)

This two family home in Austin uses so many large glass walls that it seems like an open air living space. Inspired by Asian architecture, the architects used large glass sheets to ensure spatial continuity between the indoor and outdoor spaces. Incorporating a body of water that perfectly matches the floor height further extends the space by reflecting light and, with a cluster of water plants carefully positioned so that they can be seen from various viewpoints, it adds a natural element that balances out all the steel and glass. Plus, take a look at that glowing garage and the sail used on the upper level to create a shady outdoor living space.

A few details/quotes from Dwell on the project:

The exterior walls of the Bercy house are constructed with Thermasteel, panels made from galvanized steel and a unique resin that provide structural framing, insulation, and vapor barrier with an R-29 rating twice the required amount. “We have so much glass that we have to offset it by having very efficient ceiling and wall systems,” says Bercy. “We wanted movable glass walls instead of tiny little sliding glass doors that pop off their tracks all the time,” says Bercy. So he and Chen tracked down the double-glazed, insulated, six-by-nine-foot doors rom a company called Fleetwood. “They’re a little more expensive, but when you slide the heavy doors open, you’re making a profound gesture to leave the house and step outside,” says Bercy. –Dwell

Viking Counter-depth refrigerator

I’ve long been on a hunt for a counter-depth refrigerator so I can finish my kitchen. It seems that the only counter-depth refrigerators are always about $5000 or higher–which is cost-prohibitive to say the least. Somehow I managed to find one for just under $2000.

Width: 35-5/8″
Width with Side Panels: 35-7/8″
Height from Bottom: 70 -1/8″
Height from Bottom with Tops/Grilles: 71-7/8″
Depth to Front of Door: 26-3/4″
Energy Star Rated

Purchase Information:

Price: $1999.00
Availability: Buy Viking Counter-depth refrigerator here

Digitus Numbering by Daniil Dadiomov

From the geniuses at Art Lebedev, digitus self stick pixel door numbers. Judging by the finish, it’s probably not very weatherproof, so it should be used in interior spaces such as apartment, office or hotel room doors.

Available in: white, terracotta, metallic blue, metallic green, metallic magenta

Figure height: 5.5 cm (2.17?)

Purchase Information:

Price: $5.77 ea
Availability: Buy Digitus Numbering by Daniil Dadiomov here

Stacked Paperback Wallpaper

Tracey Kendall’s paperback wallpaper will make you look like a bookworm on some serious performance-enhancing drugs. And who doesn’t want that? This would be spectacular in a small nook or a small room; you’d have your own instant haphazard library. Or, best idea yet, put this wallpaper at the back of your bookshelves, and voilà! you’re done. (Sort of similar to the Genuine Fake Bookshelf Wallpaper, except maybe a tiny bit better because of the color perhaps?)

* Adhesive required
* Hand-screenprinted paper
* Roll: 144″L, 18.25″W
* Covers 18 square feet
* Handcrafted in England

(£124.18)

Purchase Information:

Price: $198.00
Availability: Buy Stacked Paperback Wallpaper here

Joris Laarman’s Small Heatwave Radiator for Droog Design

I love Joris Laarman’s Heatwave Radiator and I’m happy to discover there is a smaller version with an easier-to-swallow price tag.

Purchase Information:

Price: $2750
Availability: Buy Joris Laarman’s Small Heatwave Radiator for Droog Design here

Lego Kitchen

Just how fun is this kitchen island covered in Lego? Pretty fantastic idea.

Munchausen, a duo formed by Parisian designers Simon Pillard and Philippe Rosetti, took a bold approach with their own kitchen by venturing to IKEA for the basic kitchen island and then spending the next week covering it with more than 20,000 pieces by another Scandinavian brand, Lego. –The Cool Hunter

More information:

View Lego Kitchen here

Source: Via

Crinkle Tissue Box Cover

If you’re not going to go all out minimal with your tissues (see the Kazan or the Toro Tissue Ring), this cover will make those frightful floral boxes disappear nicely.

Made of durable plastic, this white tissue box cover has a delicate crinkled paper design that adds style to standard tissue boxes (not included).

Made in Germany
Size: 5″ cube

Purchase Information:

Price: $28.00
Availability: Buy Crinkle Tissue Box Cover here